It’s 3 o’clock in the morning …

June 21st 2017

Some of us really love the long hours of daylight at this time of year while others struggle to sleep, resorting to blackout blinds and eye-masks to hide from the light.

What is certain is that the birds make full use of this daylight bounty to get on with the frantic annual business of raising several broods of offspring. Part of this ritual involves singing.

The Song Thrush in this photo, assuming nothing caused a change in the occupier of the territory, has to be admired for his stamina. For months now he has been singing in Culkein Drumbeg, at first to establish his territory, then attract a mate, then hold his territory, then encourage his mate to stay on her eggs then to go through the last three steps all over again.

So with little in the way of darkness to interrupt his serenading I can fall asleep at night around 11 pm with his song still audible and then the earliest I have heard him has been 3.10 am! By 6 am there is no stopping him; even today as I write this he is singing, albeit with a bit less gusto, despite the rain and strong wind.

It is a long winter for him though!

D. Haines

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Recent Sightings

Greylag Goose

Eleven birds feeding on margins of frozen Loch an Aigeil (AS) (22/01)

Common Gull

Flock of 29 feeding on Stoer Green (AS) (21/01)

Goldfinch

c20 birds on garden trees, Drumbeg (Nancy Millar) (17/01)

Great Spotted Woodpecker

Two separate reports of birds using peanut and fat ball feeders in gardens at almost opposite ends of Assynt. Single bird on peanut feeder, Elphin (Rosie Christmas) Single bird on fat ball feeder, Culkein Drumbeg (Carol Langford) (17/01)

Twite

26 birds at Split Rock, Clachtoll (AS) (16/01)

Fieldfare

Small flock of 20 at Clachtoll (AS) (16/01)

Goldcrest

Single bird foraging under garden feeders, Torbreck (Jack Wright) (14/01)

Dipper

Three birds on River Inver opposite Little Assynt Tree Nursery (DAH). At least one of these birds was singing. (12/01)

Map